Founders

Our founders, Drs. Howard and Georgeanna Jones, trained hundreds of physicians in assisted reproductive technology. Their academic and clinical instruction indirectly contributed to more than a quarter of a million IVF births in the United States, including over 3,800 babies born as a result of treatment at the Jones Institute.

 

Howard W. Jones, Jr., M.D.

Until his death at the age of 104 in 2015, Dr. Jones was Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology at Eastern Virginia Medical School, and Honorary Chairman of the Board of the Jones Foundation for Reproductive Medicine. He was also Professor Emeritus of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine where he served as Professor of Gynecology and Obstetrics, acting Chairman of the Department, and Secretary General of the John Hopkins University Program for International Education.

Dr. Jones received his BA degree from Amherst College and his MD degree from Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He had been awarded honorary degrees by the University of Cordoba, Old Dominion University, Amherst College, the University of Madrid, and Eastern Virginia Medical School. He was also the recipient of the Medal of the College of France and the Distinguished Service Award of the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology, and had been made an honorary member of over 20 foreign scientific societies, including the Fellowship ad eundem of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

Drs. Howard Wilbur and Georgeanna Seegar Jones, moved to Norfolk in 1978 and accepted the challenge of creating an in vitro fertilization program at Eastern Virginia Medical School. The Joneses are responsible for the birth of the first IVF baby in the United States.

Dr. Jones held key positions in the development of ethical standards for reproductive technologies. He was a past Chairman of the American Fertility Society Ethics Committee on Reproductive Technology. Dr. Howard Jones and Dr. Georgeanna Jones were the only American gynecologists invited by the Vatican to participate on a panel to advise Pope John Paul II concerning assisted reproduction. Scientists from as far away as Europe, Africa, Australia, Asia, and South America traveled to Norfolk to learn from the Drs. Howard and Georgeanna Jones and their colleagues.

 

Dr. Georgeanna Jones

Until her death at the age of 92 in 2005, Dr. Jones was a Professor Emeritus of Obstetrics and Gynecology at both the Eastern Virginia Medical School and Johns Hopkins University Medical School, and was an Honorary Director of the Board of the Jones Foundation for Reproductive Medicine.

Dr. Jones received her BA from Goucher College in 1932 and her MD from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1936. She completed her postgraduate training at Johns Hopkins as a house officer in gynecology and as a National Cancer Institute trainee. She also performed laboratory research in endocrinology for the medical school's department of surgery.

After her training, she was named Director of Johns Hopkins' Laboratory of Reproductive Physiology and gynecologist-in-charge of the hospital's gynecological endocrine clinic. She remained in these positions until moving to Norfolk in 1978.

Dr. Jones was a member of numerous local, state, national, and international medical societies. She served as President of the American Fertility Society in 1970. Her honorary degrees include those from Goucher College, Old Dominion University, Amherst College, and Eastern Virginia Medical School. She achieved numerous honors including the 1966 Rubin Award, the 1971 Barren Foundation Award, Virginia Woman of the Year in 1982, the Medical College of Pennsylvania's Woman Scientist of the Year in 1985, Society of Hopkins Scholars in 1986, and the Cosmopolitan Club of Norfolk Distinguished Service Award Medal in 1988.

Dr. Jones wrote several textbooks and more than 350 infertility research papers.

 

Dr. Mason C. Andrews

A native of Norfolk, Dr. Andrews graduated from Princeton University and later Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he received his medical and obstetrics and gynecology training. He returned to Norfolk and established an active obstetrics and gynecology practice. In the early sixties, he worked to establish the Eastern Virginia Medical School and served as the first Chairman of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Department from 1974 until 1990.

Dr. Andrews was an active civic leader. He served on the Norfolk City Council from 1974 until 2000 and as Mayor from 1992 until 1994. His civic contributions were numerous and included the revitalization of the city's waterfront, the founding of the medical school and development of the downtown Norfolk campus of Tidewater Community College. He was named "First Citizen of Norfolk" in 1968 and served as President of the American Gynecological and Obstetrical Society in 1994.

 
 

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